A PHIL BRODIE BAND'S FUN PAGE . . ENJOY
Updated for March 2017



IT'S A FIRST
?? What or Which was first ??
?? Who was the first to do What ??


NEW ONE EVERY MONTH

* The first website quoted to be made was a 1991 Cern (European Organization for Nuclear Research Organisation) website, a file uploaded and published to an as yet quite early form of the internet. Today can be found on this link: http://info.cern.ch/
* William Holden was one of Hollywood’s most storied and famous actors and in 1957 he starred in the production of "The Bridge on the River Kwai" and was paid $1 million dollars for his work. He was the highest paid actor of his day and the first to receive $1 million for a single role.
* Richard Lawrence was 1st known person to attempt to assassinate an American President. On January 30th 1835 President Andrew Jackson was attending the funeral of South Carolina congressman Warren R. Davis, when Lawrence fired two pistols at point-blank range. Both misfired.
* The first Christmas Club savings account concept originated at Pennsylvania's Carlisle Trust Company in 1909. Bank treasurer Merkel Landis came up with the idea of offering customers 3% interest on money deposited in a special Christmas account. They received coupons each time they put money in the account, and in early December they were able to redeem their accumulated coupons and hit the local stores flush with cash. Three hundred and fifty customers took advantage of the plan, and the average amount in each account on December 1st was $28 (around $500 in today's dollars).
* In 1917, Walter Yeo became the first person in history to have modern plastic surgery after suffering horrific injuries while on HMS Warspite in World War one. He was treated by Sir Harold Gillies, who performed skin grafts. Sir Harold Gillies was the first man to use skin grafts from undamaged areas on the body and known as ‘the father of plastic surgery’
* The 1896 Summer Olympics, officially known as the Games of the I Olympiad, was the first international Olympic Games held in modern history. Organised by the International Olympic Committee (IOC), which had been created by Pierre de Coubertin, it was held in Athens, Greece, from 6 to 15 April 1896. Ten of the 14 participating nations earned medals. The United States won the most gold medals, 11; host nation Greece won the most medals overall, 46 ....
* In 1649, Mary Hammon and Sarah Norman of Plymouth Colony, USA, were charged with "lewd behavior upon a bed"; they were the first American women to be convicted of lesbian activity, Hammon was only admonished, perhaps because she was younger than sixteen, but in 1650 Norman was convicted and required to acknowledge publicly her "unchaste behavior" with Hammon, as well as warned against future offenses. (This may be the only conviction for lesbianism in American history)
* Lucy Hobbs Taylor was the first American woman to earn a doctorate in dentistry. In November 1865, she entered the Ohio College of Dental Surgery, where in 1866 she earned her doctorate in dentistry, becoming the first woman in the United States to do so
.
* In March 2014, 19 year old Danny Bowman
was named Britain's first "selfie" addict, after becoming obsessed with taking the perfect picture of himself. During the height of his addiction, Danny spent ten hours a day trying to take a flawless of himself on his iPhone. He would take up to 200 photos, but was rarely happy with the results. His addiction got so bad, he stopped going to school and refused to leave the house for six months. Whenever his parents tried to stop him from taking pictures, he would become aggressive towards them. His obsession eventually drove him to take an overdose and the teen had to undergo intensive hospital therapy to treat his addiction.

* The first book generally regarded as the first English dictionary was written as Robert Cawdrey, a schoolmaster and former Church of England clergyman, in 1604 Cawdrey made use of wordlists published earlier in educational texts, such as Richard Mulcaster’s Elementary in 1582 and Edmund Coote’s English Schoole-maister in 1596.

* In January 2012 scientists identified the first-ever hybrid shark off the coast of Australia, a discovery that suggests some shark species "may" respond to changing ocean conditions by interbreeding with one another. A team of 10 Australian researchers identified multiple generations of sharks that arose from mating between the common blacktip shark (Carcharhinus limbatus) and the Australian blacktip (Carcharhinus tilstoni), which is smaller and lives in warmer waters than its global counterpart
.
* The first person to take a selfie is thought to be Robert Cornelius, when he took what is believed to be the world's first selfie, a self-portrait he snapped one day in October 1839 while standing in the yard behind his family's lamp store in Philadelphia.
* The first documentation of a screwdriver is in the medieval Housebook of Wolfegg Castle, a manuscript written sometime between 1475 and 1490.. Screws were used in the 15th century for securing breastplates, backplates, and helmets on medieval jousting armor — screws, hence screwdrivers; screws were not used in full combat armor, most likely to give the wearer freedom of movement.
* Brothers Frank, Simeon, and William Reno Committed the first US train robbery. On October 6th 1866, the Reno brothers boarded an eastbound train in Indiana wearing masks and toting guns. After emptying one safe and tossing the other out the window, the robbers jumped off the train and made an easy getaway

* The Fairey’s Great West Aerodrome, at the village of Heath Row was officially handed over to the Air Ministry as London’s new civil airport on January 1st 1946. The first aircraft to take off from Heathrow was a converted Lancaster bomber called Starlight that flew to Buenos Aires. The first passenger terminals were ex-military marquees which formed a tented village along the Bath Road and the first passenger planes were converted ex-military planes.
* The first person to decorate and light up a Christmas tree was reportedly the Protestant reformer Martin Luther (1483-1546). According to legend, he was so moved by the beauty of the stars shining between the branches of a fir tree, he brought home an evergreen tree and decorated it with candles to share the image with his children.
* The hot air balloon is the oldest successful human-carrying flight technology. Early unmanned hot air balloons were used in China. Zhuge Liang of the Shu Han kingdom, during the Three Kingdoms era (220–280 AD), used airborne lanterns for military signaling. The first untethered manned hot air balloon flight was performed by Jean-François Pilâtre de Rozier and François Laurent d'Arlandes on November 21th 1783, in Paris, France, in a balloon created by the Montgolfier brothers. The first hot-air balloon flown in the United States was launched from the Walnut Street Jail in Philadelphia on January 9th 1793 by the French aeronaut Jean Pierre Blanchard.
* Margaret Hughes aka Peg Hughes or Margaret Hewes, is credited as the first professional actress on the English stage. Her first performance was on December 8th 1660, in a production of Shakespeare's play Othello, when she played the role of Desdemona in a production by Thomas Killigrew's new King's Company at their Vere Street theatre.
* Awful AKA's !!! ... Ivan IV aka Ivan the Terrible, became the 1st Tsar of Russia in 1547 and six years later Queen Mary I aka Bloody Mary became the 1st reigning queen of England in 1553.
* The first Crisp Sandwich café opened in Belfast, Northern Ireland by owner Andrew McMenamin in January 2015. Customers at "Simply Crispy" can choose from 35 different crisp flavours and three different types of bread to make their ham and cheese sandwiches. The crisp sandwich café, which initially started life as a joke, sold out two hours after opening.
* Convicted murderer, William Francis Kemmler of Buffalo, New York, was the first person in the world to be legally executed using an electric chair on August 6th 1890. It was performed by the first electric chair executioner, Edwin Davis who was officially given the title of "State Electrician". The generator was charged with 1,000 volts, which passed through Kemmler for 17 seconds and Dr. Edward Charles Spitzka declared him dead. However it was soon noticed, he was not dead, so they quickly shocked him again, but this time with 2,000 volts. To the horror of the 17 witnesses, Kemmler's blood vessels burst and he seemed to set on fire and the strench was unbearable; the screaming witnesses tried to flee the room, but unfortunately for them, the door was locked !
* 1915:- Audrey Munson became the first leading actress to do nude film scene, in the silent movie "Inspiration" (She was also the model or inspiration for more than fifteen statues in New York City). In 1934, American studios passed the Hays Code, which forbid scenes of nudity in American films. The ban was not lifted until the 1960’s, after which , Jayne Mansfield became the first mainstream American actress to appear nude in the 1963 film "Promises! Promises!".
* In April of 2015, Ms. Rachael David, a student at North Shore Hebrew Academy High School, accepted an offer of admission to West Point, which would, according to the military academy’s officials, make her the only graduate of an Orthodox yeshiva, male or female, to attend West Point in its 213-year history!
* The first ever website was published on August 6th 1991 and served up a page explaining the World Wide Web project and giving information on how users could setup a web server and how to create their own websites and web pages, as well as how they could search the web for information. The URL for the first ever web page put up on the first ever website was http://info.cern.ch/hypertext /WWW /TheProject.html. This link is no longer active and, unfortunately, nobody bothered to make a copy of this original page.
* In 1886 the first glass of soda-fountain Coke cost five cents — about 80p today. By 1950, the cost of a bottle was about the same. A can of Coke in a supermarket is now about 70p.
* 1066 and the Normans brought to Britain the stone motte and bailey castles. The first to be built, and the most famous of these was the White Tower of the Tower of London. This stone tower was begun in 1070, and marked the start of a stone-castle building spree. By the time William the Conqueror died in 1087, 86 of these had been built in Briton.
* 1941 on July 1st, is the date when the first official, paid television advertisement was broadcast in the United States over New York station WNBT (now WNBC) before a baseball game between the Brooklyn Dodgers and Philadelphia Phillies. The announcement for Bulova watches, for which the company paid anywhere from $4.00 to $9.00 (reports vary), displayed a WNBT test pattern modified to look like a clock with the hands showing the time. The Bulova logo, with the phrase "Bulova Watch Time", was shown in the lower right-hand quadrant of the test pattern while the second hand swept around the dial for one minute.
* 1903 on July 15th, the newly formed Ford Motor Company took its first order from Chicago dentist Ernst Pfenning: an $850 two-cylinder Model A automobile with a tonneau aka backseat. The car, produced at Ford's plant on Mack Street, now Mack Avenue, in Detroit, was delivered to Dr. Pfenning just over a week later.
* 1324:- Dame Alice Kyteler, a Hiberno-Norman noblewoman was the earliest person accused and condemned for witchcraft in Ireland. She fled the country, but her servant Petronella de Meath was flogged and burned at the stake on November 3rd 1324. This case also seems to contain the first recorded claim of a witch sleeping with her incubus, a demon in male form, who was in reality, Robin Artisson.
* In 1867, Spring Heeled Jack became the first UK comic book superhero. The folkloric Spring Heeled Jack made his debut in a series of Penny Dreadfuls, first as a villain, then as a crime-fighter with a disguise, secret lair, and gadgets, all the hallmarks of a superhero.
* In 1901, Annie Taylor at the age of 64, was the 1st woman to go over Niagara Falls in a barrel.
* In 1799, Count de Grisley was the 1st magician to perform the trick of sawing a woman in half .
* In 1903, Maurice Garin was the 1st Tour de France winner.
* In 1910, Baroness Raymonde de la Roche 1st licensed woman pilot. She received ticket No. 36 on March 8th.

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